WAPART

WAPART

 

Water-based particulate approach to

organic photovoltaics with controlled morphology

 

WAPART project illustration

 

Description

Research in organic solar cells have made tremendousprogress in recent years, with reports of achieved power conversionefficiencies approaching 10% (comparable to the efficiency of amorphoussilicon). This implies that organic solar cells is close to being capable ofcompeting with already commercial technology, and thus to market entry.

The transfer to scalable processing methods however,presents new requirements for more complete control of the nano-structures inthe active layers and large fabrication challenges in the widespread use ofharmful chlorinated and aromatic solvents.

Recently, we have shown that it is possible to prepareworking solar cells from aqueous dispersions of binary blend nano-particles.The nano-structure dimensions can be effectively controlled by preparingnano-particles of acceptor/donor blends, with the particle dimensions settingthe upper limit for blend demixing, improving the nano-structure lifetime aswell. We will explore the use of such water-based inks for use in scalable,roll-to-roll coating of organic solar cells, suitable for industrialprocessing.

New nano-structures arising from such materials willbe thoroughly examined using a wide range of x-ray techniques e.g. small/wide angle X-ray scattering (SAXS/WAXS) and Absorption FineStructure (XAFS). It will be complemented by atomic force microscopy (AFM) surfacecharacterization and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A special interestwill be taken in resolving the real 2D and 3D nano-structure morphology of theactive layer using X-ray tomography. To achieve spatial resolution in the nanometer scale we will closely cooperate with leading experts in the field of 3Dreconstruction from the DTU institute of informatics and mathematical modeling.

Intotal the project will take the necessary steps to make thetransfer of organic photovoltaics to a fully water-based process, providingaccess for industry to a commercial and environmental friendly nano-technologyfor production of sustainable energy.

 

 People  

/upload/dtu energikonvertering/pics/wapart/emil.jpgEmil Bøje Lind Pedersen
Ph.D. student
Department of Energy Conversion and Storage
Technical University of Denmark

 

/upload/dtu energikonvertering/pics/wapart/jens.jpgJens Wenzel Andreasen
Senior Scientist
Department of Energy Conversion and Storage
Technical University of Denmark

 

/upload/dtu energikonvertering/pics/wapart/donghong.pngDonghong Yu
Associate Professor
Section of Chemistry
Aalborg University, Denmark

 

/upload/dtu energikonvertering/pics/wapart/rasmus.jpgRasmus Guldbæk Brandt
PhD student
Section of Chemistry
Aalborg University, Denmark

 

/upload/dtu energikonvertering/pics/wapart/henrik.jpgHenrik Aanæs
Associate professor
Department of informatics and mathmatical modeling
Technical University of Denmark

 

/upload/dtu energikonvertering/pics/wapart/jiang.jpgShingchung Jiang 
Professor 
School of Materials science and Engineering
Tianjin University

 

/upload/dtu energikonvertering/pics/wapart/yeanhou.jpgYanhou Geng
Professor
Changchun institute of applied chemistry
Chinese academy of science

 

/upload/dtu energikonvertering/pics/wapart/xie.jpgXie Zhiyuan
Professor
Changchun institute of applied chemistry
Chinese academy of science